International FASD Awareness Day

Back to Blog Listing Page | | September 9, 2011

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Awareness Day is observed every year by people around the world to raise awareness of the danger of drinking during pregnancy. September 9th signifies the 9th day of the 9th month of the year where the world will remember that during the 9 months of pregnancy, there is no safe amount or time to drink alcohol.

Covenant House Vancouver is no stranger to FAS/FASD as we have worked with many youth over the years that are affected by it. FASD is an umbrella term used to describe a number of birth defects caused by mothers who consumed alcohol during pregnancy, which can result in damage to a child’s central nervous system.

Some of the behavioural issues that affect those with FASD are immature or inappropriate behaviour, poor judgement, impulse control problems and memory deficits. As you can guess the transition from youth to independent adult can be especially difficult for those with FAS/FASD. We are lucky to have a strong team of mental health clinicians and youth workers that are able to recognized FASD and have the skills to work those young people affected by it.

To learn more about FASD/FAS click here and here.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Awareness Day is observed every year by people around the world to raise awareness of the danger of drinking during pregnancy. September 9th signifies the 9th day of the 9th month of the year where the world will remember that during the 9 months of pregnancy, there is no safe amount or time to drink alcohol.

Covenant House Vancouver is no stranger to FAS/FASD as we have worked with many youth over the years that are affected by it. FASD is an umbrella term used to describe a number of birth defects caused by mothers who consumed alcohol during pregnancy, which can result in damage to a child’s central nervous system.

Some of the behavioural issues that affect those with FASD are immature or inappropriate behaviour, poor judgement, impulse control problems and memory deficits. As you can guess the transition from youth to independent adult can be especially difficult for those with FAS/FASD. We are lucky to have a strong team of mental health clinicians and youth workers that are able to recognized FASD and have the skills to work those young people affected by it.

To learn more about FASD/FAS click here and here.