Safety & Sanctuary for Youth & Pigeons!

Most people find pigeons to be pests, their droppings certainly are and even my co-worker referred to them as flying rats. Being downtown with a lovely patio on our rooftop attracts droves of these shimmering birds to our building. But I think there is more to it then the comfy lodging we provide them. Recently one silly pigeon decided to make a nest in a large plant potter right smack dab in the middle of the courtyard of our shelter. At first I thought to myself, and aloud, “what a dumb pigeon why would anyone want to sit on a couple eggs in a place with close to 30 young people running around?” It has been over a week now, pigeons and eggs remain in their spot. After some research I learned that the mother and father pigeons take turns incubating the eggs, I think that is pretty cool. The eggs need to be incubated for up to 19 days however, which seems like such a long time considering the high traffic area the nest is located in. I let any youth that would listen to me in on my new found knowledge. When someone got too curious and approached the nest they would be met with jeers from their co-residents “Get away from there, she’ll abandon her nest!”

Most people find pigeons to be pests, their droppings certainly are and even my co-worker referred to them as flying rats. Being downtown with a lovely patio on our rooftop attracts droves of these shimmering birds to our building. But I think there is more to it then the comfy lodging we provide them. Recently one silly pigeon decided to make a nest in a large plant potter right smack dab in the middle of the courtyard of our shelter. At first I thought to myself, and aloud, “what a dumb pigeon why would anyone want to sit on a couple eggs in a place with close to 30 young people running around?” It has been over a week now, pigeons and eggs remain in their spot. After some research I learned that the mother and father pigeons take turns incubating the eggs, I think that is pretty cool. The eggs need to be incubated for up to 19 days however, which seems like such a long time considering the high traffic area the nest is located in. I let any youth that would listen to me in on my new found knowledge. When someone got too curious and approached the nest they would be met with jeers from their co-residents “Get away from there, she’ll abandon her nest!”

Eventually, I came to realize that maybe these pigeons aren’t so dim. And maybe they come here for the same reason our youth come to us time and time again: safety and sanctuary. I believe animals can sense these kind of things and hopefully we get to see two little baby pigeons being born in 10 to 12 days! 

We will keep you updated and hopefully get some picture of the babies.